Monthly Archives: April 2016

30 Faces of Autism – Day 25 | Annapolis Family Photography | Autism Awareness

Children with higher functioning autism look very ‘normal’. Sometimes they may even act very ‘normal’. At times, this makes strangers, and even other parents, family members or teachers think that the issue is just a disobedient child or a bad parent. They may even see his or her progress and say that they are outgrowing […]

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30 Faces of Autism – Day 24 | DC Family Photography | Autism Awarness

Siblings of autistic children are seven times more likely to develop autism than those without siblings with autism. This equals out to a 1 in 5, or a 20% chance. When it comes to identical twins, if one twin has autism the other has a 76% chance of also being diagnosed with it compared to […]

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30 Faces of Autism – Day 23 | Southern Maryland Family Portraits | Autism Awareness

One of the common misconceptions hwith individuals with autism is they are not social. While some are not social at all, most children and adults on the spectrum desire to have friends and relationships. Some individuals with autism may be extremely social, but just not understand all the social cues and social rules. They may […]

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30 Faces of Autism – Day 22 | Northern Virginia Family Photography | Autism Awareness

We go through life with one viewpoint, our own. In many cases your neighbors, coworkers, peers, and family members may share similar viewpoints on certain things. Individuals with autism view the world entirely different. Talking with them and finding what speaks to them can be one of the most rewarding things you will ever do. […]

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30 Faces of Autism – Day 21 | Chesapeake Beach Photography | Autism Awareness

His shirt says it all…“I’ll move mountains someday”. I completely and whole-heartedly believe this is true. Children with autism may learn differently, but it’s up to the parents, caregivers and teachers to unlock the secret of how their brain works and really strive to understand them. Teach them in a way that makes sense to […]

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